Fujitsu Microelectronics launches high-efficiency power management LSI for ultra-mobile PCs

By : |September 30, 2007 0

BANGALORE: Fujitsu Microelectronics Asia Pte Ltd (FMAL) has announced the development of a one-chip system power management LSI for ultra-mobile PCs (UMPCs), to supply power to the system, memory, and chipsets in UMPCs (Ultra Mobile PCs).

As an industry first for one-chip integration, the MB39C308 complies with the upcoming version of the Low Power Intel Architecture (LPIA) specification proposed by Intel Corporation as a low-power platform for UMPCs. The MB39C308 also meets the next-generation LPIA platform requirement of a six-channel DC/DC converter (*1) control circuit, while integrating other peripheral components onto the chip. This enables the power management system to be reduced to less than one-third the size of other similar products. The increased efficiency of the new device’s power supply is a major factor in extending the operating time of the UMPC battery.

The MB39C308 was jointly developed with Fujitsu VLSI Limited, utilizing Laterally Diffused MOS (LDMOS) technology. By using an LDMOS technology and revising the transistor structure, the MB39C308 supplies power from a lithium-ion battery at high-efficiency rates without dispersion. The DC/DC converter control circuits incorporated in the chip generate voltages across six different channels and support power for memory, the chipset and external systems such as wireless LAN, as required in the 2008 version of the LPIA platform.

                                 

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Also, a switching FET integrated in the MB39C308 can drive a current of 1.5 Amps to 3.5 Amps. This benefits the memory and chipset, reducing the number of peripheral components and the size of the power management system. In addition, by optimizing components to comply with the LPIA platform and embedding them into the power management IC, it becomes possible to eliminate the requirement to set voltage or current when designing power management systems.

Ultra-compact mobile PCs can run the same operating system as regular-sized PCs. For these UMPCs, it is necessary to supply differing voltages to the processor, chipset memory, and other parts. To extend the operating time of the battery, processor consumption must be reduced and power management ICs are required in order to reduce power supply system size, including control circuits that can supply a large current with high efficiency from a lithium ion battery.

Launched in 2006, the market for UMPCs is likely to reach five million units in 2008. Responding to the growing needs, Fujitsu plans to expand its line-up of power management LSIs for UMPCs.

Key Features

1. One-chip DC/DC converter control circuit, compliant with next LPIA platform for UMPCs

DC/DC converter control circuits, which generate voltages across 6 different channels and which support power for memory (excluding the processor), the chipset and external systems (various applications such as wireless LAN) as outlined in the 2008 version of the LPIA platform, have been integrated onto a single chip.

2. Realizes high-efficiency power supply required for UMPCs

By utilizing a new LDMOS technology (*2) and revising the transistor structure, this new LSI makes it possible to supply power from a lithium ion battery as a large current at high efficiency rates, without dispersion.

3. Reduced size and simplified design of power-managing system through reduction of peripheral components

For the memory and chipset, by integrating into the power management LSI a switching FET (*3) capable of driving a large current of 1.5 Amperes to 3.5 Amperes, the number of necessary peripheral components has been reduced. This enables a size reduction of the power management system to less than one-third (1/3) that of conventional products from other companies. In addition, by optimizing various setting components so that they are compliant with the LPIA platform, and embedding them into the power management LSI, effort that had been required in the past to set voltage or current when designing power management systems is now alleviated.

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