Infosys expands presence in Sydney

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Infosys expects to hire 85 new employees in NSW alone to keep up with client demand in the coming financial year

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: Infosys, a leader player in consulting, technology and outsourcing, has opened a new Sydney branch office to keep pace with business growth of more than 500 percent in New South Wales (NSW) over the past five years.

The Hon Barry O'Farrell MP, premier of New South Wales, and Infosys founder and executive chairman, N.R. Narayana Murthy, were present for the inauguration.

Highlights

· Infosys expects to hire 85 new employees in NSW alone to keep up with client demand in the coming financial year

· The new office in NSW, with a capacity of 140 seats, will accommodate both new local staff to be hired and specialists who come to Australia for short-term projects throughout the year

· The majority of Infosys staff in NSW will continue to work on client sites across the greater Sydney area

· Infosys currently employs approximately 2,600 people based across Australia and New Zealand


The Hon Barry O'Farrell PM, premier of New South Wales: "The growth of Infosys in Sydney reinforces that India is a key priority in our international engagement. Companies like Infosys are helping grow our knowledge economy through investment and partnerships, which accelerate global competitiveness for Australian companies."

Jackie Korhonen, Infosys senior vice president and country head for Australia and New Zealand: "Australia is the third largest market for Infosys globally and one of our fastest growing markets. We are seeing healthy growth across the region. The New South Wales financial services and communications work in particular is driving a lot of our hiring. "

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